COC

Focus Two: Root Causes of Debt

RBW Project speaks in Congressional Hearings on Debt and Responsible Lending (November 2007)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Thu, Nov 29, 2007

RBW Project speaks in Congressional Hearings on Debt and Responsible Lending (November 2007)

On November 8 2007, RBW staff Aldo Caliari joined other members of Jubilee USA as a witness in hearings of the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Financial Services, on the Jubilee Act for Responsible Lending and Expanded Debt Cancellation of 2007.
Debt forgiveness should be part of pro-development trade agenda, US NGOs tell Congress (October 2007)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Sun, Oct 7, 2007

Debt forgiveness should be part of pro-development trade agenda, US NGOs tell Congress (October 2007)

As part of the efforts surrounding the Cancel Debt Fast, aimed at passing in Congress the Jubilee Act, being promoted by Jubilee USA, more than fifty organizations with diverse trade backgrounds have signed onto a letter addressed to members of Congress that argues debt cancellation needs to be a key component of a pro-development trade agenda.
 
Click here for the letter.

Click here for more information on the Jubilee Act.

 

Preventing New Cycles of Debt. A CIDSE Background Paper. (June 2007)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Sat, Jun 30, 2007

Preventing New Cycles of Debt. A CIDSE Background Paper. (June 2007)

A Human Development Approach To Preventing New Cycles of Debt

The G8 and the international financial institutions (IFIs) have recently emphasized their concerns about what they call “free-riding”, i.e. the situation in which “non-concessional lenders indirectly obtain financial gain from IDA’s debt forgiveness, grants and concessional financing activities without paying for it.

In this paper, written by Aldo Caliari from Center of Concern and Jean Merckaert from CCFD on behalf of the CIDSE/Caritas Internationalis Working Group on Resources for Development, the functioning of the existing mechanisms for ensuring debt sustainability in the long run, including mechanisms to address debt reaccumulation, are analyzed from a human development perspective.

The New World Bank/IMFDebt Sustainability Framework: A Human Development Assessment (April 2006)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Wed, May 3, 2006

The New World Bank/IMFDebt Sustainability Framework: A Human Development Assessment (April 2006)

In this paper for CIDSE ( International Cooperation for Development and Solidarity), Rethinking Bretton Woods project Director Aldo Caliari looks at the debt sustainability framework of the World Bank and International Monetary Fund (IMF) based on an approach that holds that human development imperatives should take precedence over debt payments, a principle that has been partially endorsed by the International Conference on Financing for Development and other international instruments. 
A Human Development Approach to Debt Sustainability (April 2006)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Sat, Apr 29, 2006

A Human Development Approach to Debt Sustainability (April 2006)

This panel discussion at the World Bank's spring 2006 meetings brought together civil society representatives, staff and Board members of the Bretton Woods Institutions to examine the following questions:  Has the Debt Sustainability Framework been up to the task? Does it address the flaws of the HIPC Initiative? Does it incorporate the call by civil society organizations to cancel the debt as an instrument to free resources to fulfill human development priorities?
RBW delivers papers at UNCTAD meeting on Debt Sustainabilty and Development Strategies (2005)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Tue, Nov 22, 2005

RBW delivers papers at UNCTAD meeting on Debt Sustainabilty and Development Strategies (2005)

In these papers commissioned by UNCTAD for its Expert Meeting on Debt Sustainability and Development Strategies, Aldo Caliari analyses the debt –trade connection.

The first paper focuses on debt management initiatives and the need for a change in paradigm. Debt and trade policies are perceived to be a crucial part of this complex of policies. However, the close interdependence that exists between the asymmetries in the trade system and the chronic nature of the overindebtedness problem faced by developing countries oftentimes goes missing in policy initiatives, the author argues.

The second paper focuses on the threats to debt prevention and resolution stemming from bilateral investment treaties (BITs) provisions on sovereign debt restructuring.

 

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