COC

International Monetary Fund

Austerity programs found sapping democracy, human rights in the Middle East (May 2013)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Tue, May 7, 2013

Austerity programs found sapping democracy, human rights in the Middle East (May 2013)

Participants at a recent event in Washington, D.C. addressed in the Middle East. A blog appeared on rightingfinance.org reports on a panel discussion held at the World Bank Spring meetings. The participants discussed the impacts of IMF-recommended economic policies on democracy and human rights in Egypt and other Middle Eastern countries.

Read full article.

The G20 Track Record in Disciplining the Financial Sector (December 2012)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Sat, Dec 1, 2012

The G20 Track Record in Disciplining the Financial Sector (December 2012)

In an article appeared in the last G20 Update – a newsletter published by the Heinrich Boell Foundation— RBW Project Director Aldo Caliari analyzes what has been the progress so far on the different areas of reform of the financial system pledged by the Group of 20.

The article surveys progress in the following areas: financial institutions which are “too big to fail”, derivatives, banking capital requirements, credit rating agencies, shadow banking, financial transparency and tax havens, and IMF reform.

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Fri, Jul 29, 2011

Combatting recessions and raising employment worldwide

Combatting recessions and raising employment worldwide requires a reform of the international monetary system. But... how much of that reform can be done without changes in existing international monetary law? Find out reading this article authored by RBW Project Director Aldo Caliari and recently published by the Minnesota Journal of International Law.

G20 Summit: Timid Nod Given to Reform of the Monetary System (November 2010)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Tue, Nov 30, 2010

G20 Summit: Timid Nod Given to Reform of the Monetary System (November 2010)

The Seoul Summit, held in November 11-12, 2010, gave only a very timid nod to the reform of the international monetary system, this article argues. There can be little doubt that the unique confluence of forces in 2011 and the years to follow represents the most favorable political environment to reexamine and set the basis for a renewed monetary system that the world has seen in the last 40 years. Whether those favorable factors will be enough to actually yield tangible reform, remains to be seen.

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