COC

sovereign debt

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Sun, Jul 6, 2014

RBW Attends Meetings on Sovereign Debt

On July 8, 2014, at New York University, New York, Aldo Caliari, the director of Rethinking Bretton Woods Project, participates in a meeting to contribute to conceptualizing a capacity-building program to help countries implement the "Principles on Responsible Lending and Borrowing," produced in a process convened by United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD). On July 7, 2014, Caliari took part in a meeting of UNCTAD's Working Group on a Debt Workout Mechanism, also held at New York University, New York. This meeting of the expert group comes at a critical juncture as a recent ruling by US Courts, by removing financial incentives for creditors to participate in orderly debt workouts, will make future debt restructuring even more difficult.

RBW Project speaks in Congressional Hearings on Debt and Responsible Lending (November 2007)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Thu, Nov 29, 2007

RBW Project speaks in Congressional Hearings on Debt and Responsible Lending (November 2007)

On November 8 2007, RBW staff Aldo Caliari joined other members of Jubilee USA as a witness in hearings of the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Financial Services, on the Jubilee Act for Responsible Lending and Expanded Debt Cancellation of 2007.
CAFTA Rules on Sovereign Debt: Cementing the Chains of Debt

Global Women's Project | Wed, Apr 13, 2005

CAFTA Rules on Sovereign Debt: Cementing the Chains of Debt

"The rules of the Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA) have been widely criticized by debt campaigners for embodying a model of development that is certain to maintain, if not worsen, the debt woes of its developing country members. In spite of this, CAFTA rules that directly govern the treatment of sovereign debt have received relatively little attention and exposure. In fact, by extending to sovereign debt the application of rules elaborated in the context of investment agreements and with the aim of protection of foreign investors (such as Most Favoured Nation, National Treatment and investor-state arbitration), CAFTA spares no effort to close all possible exits to the debt problems of Central American countries."