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Millennium Development Goals

Human rights should permeate sustainable development finance options (November 2014)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Sat, Nov 1, 2014

Human rights should permeate sustainable development finance options (November 2014)

 

Last August, a UN committee set up to propose options for financing the Sustainable Development Goals delivered its report, which will be an important input into the intergovernmental deliberations that will decide on means of implementing the said goals next year. This response released by RightingFinance Initiative argues that the centrality of human rights and equality should not only permeate the new development goals agreed in 2015, but also the full range of means to finance them. On this premise, RightingFinance performs a human rights audit of the report.

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Rethinking Bretton Woods | Thu, Feb 20, 2014

Event: Debt Problems of Small Vulnerable States: A Time to Act (February 2014)

On February 24, 2014, RBW Project Director Aldo Caliari spoke at “The Debt Problem of Small  Vulnerable States: A Time to Act,” a panel discussion organized by the United Nations Financing for Development Office. The event took place in the occasion of the first PrepCom in preparation for the Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States, to be held in Samoa in September 2014.

 

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Fri, Nov 22, 2013

New Cambridge Press Publication Features Aldo Caliari's Work on Millennium Development Goals and Human Rights

In a chapter contributed to the book, Millennium Development Goals and Human Rights: Past, Present, and Future, recently published by Cambridge University Press, RBW Project Director Aldo Caliari examines the relationship between Millennium Development Goal 8 and international human rights standards from a theoretical and practical perspective.

 

New development goals must have human rights at their core

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Fri, May 10, 2013

New development goals must have human rights at their core

Center of Concern is among 19 leading human rights organizations that are calling for human rights to be placed at the core of the new development agenda. The call comes as a panel of experts appointed by the UN Secretary General to issue proposals for the new development agenda is about to unveil a draft report.

 

More information on this statement, including how to endorse it (by May 13).

Think tanks see financial regulation as part of new development framework (April 2013)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Tue, Apr 16, 2013

Think tanks see financial regulation as part of new development framework (April 2013)

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In an article produced for rightingfinance.org Center of Concern staff Aldo Caliari comments on a report released by three influential think tanks, “Post-2015: Global Action for an Inclusive and Sustainable Future.” The report focuses on how global collective action can help developing countries achieve development and establishes a link between achievement of development goals and reforms of the international financial system. It is, therefore, expected to raise pressure for inclusion of financial regulation issues in the new development framework.

 

Inequality should be at the heart of new global development agenda (March 2013)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Sat, Mar 30, 2013

Inequality should be at the heart of new global development agenda (March 2013)

Rethinking Bretton Woods Project Director Aldo Caliari was among a group of economists, academics, and development experts signing on an appeal to the Bali meeting of a High Level Panel appointed by the UN Secretary General to develop ideas for the development framework that should replace the Millennium Development goals come 2015. The appeal calls for inequality to be placed at the heart of any potential post-2015 framework.

 

This focus on inequality is needed to eradicate extreme poverty by 2030. As of right now, the appeal states, the incomes of the top 1.75% exceeds the incomes of the bottom 77%. Inequality is a barrier to individual development and sustained economic growth. One of the document’s suggestions is to use Palma’s ratio as an inequality target, which argues that the top 10% of a society’s incomes should not be more than the 40% at the bottom of that society.

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