COC

trade

Equitable Trade and Southern Africa: A Cookie Cutter Approach Will Cost Lives and Livelihoods

Global Women's Project | Fri, Apr 7, 2006

Equitable Trade and Southern Africa: A Cookie Cutter Approach Will Cost Lives and Livelihoods

"As members of the U.S. - Southern Africa Customs Union Free Trade Agreement Working Group (U.S.-SACU FTA Working Group), the Center shares the goals of a more just, sustainable and prosperous human society in the region. In this spirit, the Center and and more than a dozen other groups raised serious concerns related to the negotiations of the U.S.-SACU FTA and offer recommendations that are essential to a more just trade relationship between the United States and the nations of Southern Africa in this letter to embassadors and Congressional leaders."
Gender, Health and Trade

Global Women's Project | Wed, Aug 27, 2003

Gender, Health and Trade

This document examines the link between gender, health and trade by looking at the impact of the privatization of health services on women. It also offers a close analysis of the negative implications of TRIPS negotiations that are currently taking place in the WTO. The document calls for an end to trading essential services such as health in the world trade system.
Trading for the Global Common Good

Global Women's Project | Fri, Sep 15, 2000

Trading for the Global Common Good

"Despite its lofty language and current confidence building efforts, the problems of the WTO are deeply rooted in a culture and style of negotiations that militate against its own stated goals. It is a culture driven by self-interest, competition, inequality, litigiousness and punitiveness (sanctions). Nor, does it have a moral vision that would move it beyond its current stagnation. A commitment to a global common good would provide such a moral vision. The commitment to a common good has a long history in Catholic Social Teaching. As the world has become more integrated economically and technologically, the scope of the common good is global. It goes beyond identifying economic success of a nation by its GDP (Gross Domestic Products) and raises the question of how the goods of a society and of the world are distributed among all nations and persons. The global common good in CST is a social reality to which all persons contribute and in which all persons share through participation. That social reality includes the political, economic, social, cultural and environmental context of people's and societies' lives. "
Post-Seattle Challenges for the WTO

Global Women's Project | Sun, Mar 19, 2000

Post-Seattle Challenges for the WTO

Because the U.S. media focused primarily on the protests in the streets, both violent (a truly small minority) and the non-violent (a great majority), this article will focus on the collapse of the formal ministerial meeting. The failure of the meeting can be interpreted through three lenses: political impasses, process aberrations (also political), and the role of civil society.
Catholic Social Teaching and Trade

Global Women's Project | Mon, Nov 15, 1999

Catholic Social Teaching and Trade

"The Third Ministerial Meeting of the World Trade Organization (WTO) in Seattle is an important moment in the process of constructing the global institutions that will govern life on the planet in the 21st century. The Church, with its wealth of experience, reflection and commitment to social justice, needs to be more present and more fully engaged. It needs to engage not just in the Seattle moment but especially in the longer term process of sorting out the global trade system and the structures of global governance."

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