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trade

MDGs still achievable, but role of public sector is key, CSOs say (September 2010)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Fri, Sep 24, 2010

MDGs still achievable, but role of public sector is key, CSOs say (September 2010)

“The future of democracy depends on whether civil society and trade unions can develop the capacity to counter the lobby of the financial sector.” This dramatic statement was made by Nancy Alexander, from the Heinrich Boell Foundation, at the opening of a side-event held on the fringes of the Millennium Development Goals Review Summit.

 

Jesus was an illegal alien!

Center of Concern | Mon, Oct 6, 2008

Jesus was an illegal alien!

Millions of individuals and families are living here in the U.S. in violation of U.S. immigration laws. But as a Christian, I firmly believe we have to take a more penetrating look at the situation because we believe we are all subject to a Higher Law.
WTO In Theaters Now

Global Women's Project | Thu, Sep 18, 2008

WTO In Theaters Now

Battle in Seattle is a new film by Stuart Townsend that tells the stories of a dozen fictional characters whose lives intersect over the course of the 1999 WTO Ministerial in Seattle. Today, as then, the WTO represents the very economic model that is collapsing before our eyes. The crisis in the housing and finance sectors are but the latest example of an economy based on the wrong values. As the protest signs read, it's time to put "People Before Profits."

IWG Elements Cover Letter

Global Women's Project | Wed, Jul 23, 2008

IWG Elements Cover Letter

The Interfaith Working Group on Trade and Investment offers the following statement as a guideline toward what we envision is necessary in order to make the current trade model more fair and just. We encourage you to read our alternative policies document, “Trade as if People and the Earth Mattered: a working document on alternatives”.
Trade As If People and Earth Matter:  A working document on alternatives

Global Women's Project | Wed, Jul 9, 2008

Trade As If People and Earth Matter: A working document on alternatives

Trade As If People and Earth Matter: A Working Document on Alternatives, seeks to contribute to the emerging dialogue on a new framework for trade that holds the promise of promoting just and sustainable development in the countries and areas where it is most needed. Trade policies and agreements must put people first! They should further genuine social and economic development for our neighbors around the world while preserving and creating good jobs here at home. They must support – not hinder – governments in adopting policies to protect public health and the natural environment. Trade policies must strike a balance between creating a predictable structure for international trade and preserving the policy space necessary for governments to foster and secure economic, social and human development for all their citizens.

World Bank to bypass restrictions in lending for infrastructure to Sub-National entities (May 2006)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Mon, Mar 26, 2007

World Bank to bypass restrictions in lending for infrastructure to Sub-National entities (May 2006)

 World Bank to bypass restrictions in lending for infrastructure to Sub-National entities

 By Aldo Caliari and Paul Martin

A World Bank report titled "Sub-National Development Program. A proposed World Bank Group initiative to scale up and mainstream technical assistance and financial support to sub-national entities" raises concerns about its potential to encourage further privatization and high levels of indebtedness by sub-national entities.

Trade-Related Job Losses:  A Gender Analysis

Global Women's Project | Sun, Apr 23, 2006

Trade-Related Job Losses: A Gender Analysis

This research evaluates gender biases in trade-related employment changes in the U.S. manufacturing industries.  We find that existing patterns of occupational segregation have ensured that female workers are more vulnerable to trade-related insecurities.  We also find that the patterns of segregation make it less likely that female workers will benefit from potential gains from trade.  We believe that the extent of this bias highlighted here should provide a strong motivation to evaluate the effectiveness of trade-related emloyment eompensation and adjustment programs from a gender perspective.

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