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Regional Strategy Seminar on Finance-Trade Linkages - Asia (June 2006)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Sun, Jun 18, 2006

Regional Strategy Seminar on Finance-Trade Linkages - Asia (June 2006)

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The Regional Strategy Seminar on Trade – Finance Linkages (Asia) is the second in a series of regional seminars being convened by members of the International Working Group on Trade - Finance Linkages. Such International Working Group brings together civil society organizations from both trade and financial backgrounds, North and South, with the goals of:

 

  1. increasing the effectiveness of trade and financial NGOs in achieving their respective advocacy agendas,

     

  2. find points of synergy and

     

  3. build a common, proactive advocacy platform that link trade and financial policies in ways supportive of enlarged local policy space for implementation of alternatives that promote development, gender, human rights and the environment.

     

Like the previous regional seminar, this one is oriented to strengthen the organic and sustained input of members from the region in the agenda and priority-setting of the working group and the North-South flow of information. The seminar will address ways to effectively expand and protect, across the institutions that are the target of trade and finance watchdog organizations, the policy space needed for the adoption of alternative policies. For this reflection it will use as a platform the sectors that are the backbone of the productive economy: agriculture, industry, services and power of the state to regulate foreign capital flows. The seminar will also address the potential of using trade-finance linkages in order to strategically shift the balance of ongoing negotiations in financial and trade venues.

 

 

 

 

 

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The New World Bank/IMFDebt Sustainability Framework: A Human Development Assessment (April 2006)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Wed, May 3, 2006

The New World Bank/IMFDebt Sustainability Framework: A Human Development Assessment (April 2006)

In this paper for CIDSE ( International Cooperation for Development and Solidarity), Rethinking Bretton Woods project Director Aldo Caliari looks at the debt sustainability framework of the World Bank and International Monetary Fund (IMF) based on an approach that holds that human development imperatives should take precedence over debt payments, a principle that has been partially endorsed by the International Conference on Financing for Development and other international instruments. 
A Human Development Approach to Debt Sustainability (April 2006)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Sat, Apr 29, 2006

A Human Development Approach to Debt Sustainability (April 2006)

This panel discussion at the World Bank's spring 2006 meetings brought together civil society representatives, staff and Board members of the Bretton Woods Institutions to examine the following questions:  Has the Debt Sustainability Framework been up to the task? Does it address the flaws of the HIPC Initiative? Does it incorporate the call by civil society organizations to cancel the debt as an instrument to free resources to fulfill human development priorities?
Trade-Related Job Losses:  A Gender Analysis

Global Women's Project | Sun, Apr 23, 2006

Trade-Related Job Losses: A Gender Analysis

This research evaluates gender biases in trade-related employment changes in the U.S. manufacturing industries.  We find that existing patterns of occupational segregation have ensured that female workers are more vulnerable to trade-related insecurities.  We also find that the patterns of segregation make it less likely that female workers will benefit from potential gains from trade.  We believe that the extent of this bias highlighted here should provide a strong motivation to evaluate the effectiveness of trade-related emloyment eompensation and adjustment programs from a gender perspective.
Poor Not Benefitting from World Bank Trade Policies

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Thu, Mar 23, 2006

Poor Not Benefitting from World Bank Trade Policies

A report from the World Bank's Independent Evaluation Group confirms that trade liberalization has indeed failed to benefit the poor, in large measure because liberalization advocates did not "fully take the external environment into account sufficiently, and thus did not distinguish the impact of external trade policies and shocks on trade outcomes for different groups of developing countries.

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