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Trading for the Global Common Good

Global Women's Project | Fri, Sep 15, 2000

Trading for the Global Common Good

"Despite its lofty language and current confidence building efforts, the problems of the WTO are deeply rooted in a culture and style of negotiations that militate against its own stated goals. It is a culture driven by self-interest, competition, inequality, litigiousness and punitiveness (sanctions). Nor, does it have a moral vision that would move it beyond its current stagnation. A commitment to a global common good would provide such a moral vision. The commitment to a common good has a long history in Catholic Social Teaching. As the world has become more integrated economically and technologically, the scope of the common good is global. It goes beyond identifying economic success of a nation by its GDP (Gross Domestic Products) and raises the question of how the goods of a society and of the world are distributed among all nations and persons. The global common good in CST is a social reality to which all persons contribute and in which all persons share through participation. That social reality includes the political, economic, social, cultural and environmental context of people's and societies' lives. "
New Challenges To Progress of UN Conference on Women

Global Women's Project | Tue, Mar 21, 2000

New Challenges To Progress of UN Conference on Women

At the Special Session Prepcom March 2003, the Center of Concern's Women's Project will continue to monitor the economic language that is being discussed at the regional and international levels and will call for a broader analysis of the impact of international trade and globalization on community well-being, with gender as central to the analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Post-Seattle Challenges for the WTO

Global Women's Project | Sun, Mar 19, 2000

Post-Seattle Challenges for the WTO

Because the U.S. media focused primarily on the protests in the streets, both violent (a truly small minority) and the non-violent (a great majority), this article will focus on the collapse of the formal ministerial meeting. The failure of the meeting can be interpreted through three lenses: political impasses, process aberrations (also political), and the role of civil society.
Structural Adjustment, Trade Liberalization and Women's Enjoyment of Their Economic and Social Rights

Global Women's Project | Mon, Feb 21, 2000

Structural Adjustment, Trade Liberalization and Women's Enjoyment of Their Economic and Social Rights

"In the current political and social climate of extreme market liberalism, trade liberalism and corporatism there is even greater danger of the further marginalization of economic and social rights. This is because policy makers and their economic advisers who have succumbed to the neoliberal paradigm with its emphasis on the free market, free trade and a pecuniary notion of competition, promote growth and efficiency over social development and equity."
Achieving Social Development for All in a Globalizing World

Global Women's Project | Mon, Feb 21, 2000

Achieving Social Development for All in a Globalizing World

"This Special Session of the UN General Assembly must address the growing gap between wealthy and poor and try to assess the role current processes of globalization are playing in creating that gap. It must engage the current international discussion around new types of global financial architecture from the perspective of the needs and demands of social development. Hope is being expressed in some UN circles that finding ways to implement the goals of the Social Summit effectively could provide a solution to some of the impasses created when social conditionalities are introduced into trade negotiations. This is a place to work, in other words, to develop alternatives to the more restrictive proposals advanced in Seattle at the abortive Third Ministerial meeting of the World Trade Organization."
Catholic Social Teaching and Trade

Global Women's Project | Mon, Nov 15, 1999

Catholic Social Teaching and Trade

"The Third Ministerial Meeting of the World Trade Organization (WTO) in Seattle is an important moment in the process of constructing the global institutions that will govern life on the planet in the 21st century. The Church, with its wealth of experience, reflection and commitment to social justice, needs to be more present and more fully engaged. It needs to engage not just in the Seattle moment but especially in the longer term process of sorting out the global trade system and the structures of global governance."
Economic Rights and Economic Justice in Economic Theory and Policy: An Introductory Note

Global Women's Project | Sat, Feb 21, 1998

Economic Rights and Economic Justice in Economic Theory and Policy: An Introductory Note

"As discussed in ""What Are Economic and Social Rights,"" Economic, Social and Cultural Rights have been marginalized in the evolution of the international and national human rights system. The source of this marginalization can be traced to two historical socio-political processes: male and class biases in liberalism and the post World War II cold war dynamics. However, there is yet another very important reason (which is inextricably intertwined with the capitalism / communism split) behind the marginalization of economic rights. That force is the dominant (orthodox) economic analysis and economic policy. The analytical framework of orthodox economics has historically been a very exclusive and narrow discourse based on highly restrictive assumptions about human nature, the good life, the good society and the structures that must be created to ensure the optimal operations of that society. Within this framework discussions of economic and social rights have been ignored, marginalized or otherwise subsumed under narrow discussion of efficiency, productivity, economic liberty, property rights and corporate rights. "
What are Economic and Social Rights

Global Women's Project | Sat, Feb 21, 1998

What are Economic and Social Rights

"The Universal Declaration of Human Rights affirmed the essential dignity and integrity of human beings. It recognized human beings entitlement to the means necessary to promote and protect human dignity. It also recognized the crucial and inextricable intertwinement between civil and political rights and access to resources and opportunities to utilize human capabilities for the self-realization necessary to assure and maintain personhood. This seeming comprehensiveness made the International Bill of Human Rights appear to be a radically progressive ideology which could simultaneously serve as both a set of fundamental values governing the human condition; a tool for critical consciousness raising about power structures; and a path to empowerment for much of humanity. However, as it would turn out this was not the case."
Gender Issues In International Trade

Global Women's Project | Wed, Feb 11, 1998

Gender Issues In International Trade

"Trade policies have different consequences on women and men because women and men differ in their economic and social status. Women and men respond differently to economic and trade policies because they have different sets of private resources and levels of access to public ones. Status and control over resources are intricately woven into the sexual division of labor, the assignment of productive and reproductive roles. Thus, the economic impact of trade policy on the genders must look at price and quantity effects as they relate to the differential status of men and women and their different sets of resources. Meanwhile, the social and human development impact of trade policy must look at how choice sets have been altered and how alterations have affected women and men. Both kinds of impact analysis, in turn, help determine the changes in the welfare of both genders."

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