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Financing For Development:  Disappointment, Hope, and Many Questions (2002)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Sun, Jan 13, 2002

Financing For Development: Disappointment, Hope, and Many Questions (2002)

After three years of preparation, the United Nations Financing for Development (FFD) conference will take place in Monterrey, Mexico, from March 18-22, 2002. The Center of Concern has been heavily involved in the conference’s preparatory work over the past year and a half because of this meeting’s potential for promoting worldwide development and economic justice. This article appeared in Center Focus argues that the process has put some important issues on the international development agenda but the Outcome Document to be signed by heads of state attending the Monterrey meeting, leaves much to be desired.

The WTO 2001 Meeting:  Doha - Another Seattle?

Global Women's Project | Mon, Oct 1, 2001

The WTO 2001 Meeting: Doha - Another Seattle?

"The setting for the World Trade Organization (WTO) Fourth Ministerial, November 9-13, 2001, is Doha, Qatar, the capital of a small Arab Emirate in the Persian Gulf. It could hardly be more remote from Seattle, the last WTO meeting site, geo-graphically and politically; however, its importance should not be underestimated. Six years after the WTO was founded amidst much fanfare in 1995 and two years beyond the Seattle debacle during the WTO Third Ministerial, this international institution faces a crisis of legitimacy and viability. What are the roots of this crisis?"
IGTN Positions on the WTO, Executive Summary

Global Women's Project | Wed, Aug 1, 2001

IGTN Positions on the WTO, Executive Summary

"Women declare that trade is an instrument of development not profit! The Retreat of the International Gender & Trade Network (IGTN) Held in Cape Town August 12 -18, analyzed the impact various trade agreements in the World Trade Organization, have on women, households and communities. The IGTN affirms that there is a need for countries to trade, we further state that trade serves as one of the instruments for achieving the goals that we seek: prosperity, stability, freedom, and gender equality. We will resist any form of trade that evaluates our needs from the perspective of expanding world trade instead of development and poverty eradication."
Women's Economic Agenda in the 21st Century

Global Women's Project | Fri, Jun 1, 2001

Women's Economic Agenda in the 21st Century

"This paper addresses the questions: How have women benefited from organizing at the UN over the last 25 years? What are the strengths and weaknesses of the UN as a political space for women's human rights advocacy? How is globalization addressed in the Outcomes Document of Beijing + 5 at the UN? Why are women expanding their advocacy to include international institutions such as the WB, IMF and WTO? What critiques are women formulating around trade, investment, debt relief, poverty eradication, SAPs, oversees development assistance and national economic policy-making? This paper was released as the first paper in the the Center of Concern and International Gender and Trade Network Occasional Paper Series on Gender, Development and Trade."
From Women in Development to Gender and Trade

Global Women's Project | Fri, Jun 1, 2001

From Women in Development to Gender and Trade

"This article reviews the Center's Women's Project, which was founded in 1974, in part, as a focal point for the Center's participation in the United Nations International Women's Year and the First UN Conference on Women held in Mexico City in 1975. Since then the Women's Project has been shaped by women's evolving consciousness and agenda through four World Conferences and beyond: Mexico City, 1975; Copenhagen, 1980; Nairobi, 1985; and Beijing, 1995."
The Critical Role of Human Rights in Economic Policy (Spring 2001)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Fri, May 18, 2001

The Critical Role of Human Rights in Economic Policy (Spring 2001)

This article by Aldo Caliari examines the role that human rights should play in the formation of economic policy citing a 1998 statement of the Committee on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights, “the realms of trade, finance and investment are in no way exempt from these general [human rights] principles.”

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