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IGTN Positions on the WTO, Executive Summary

Global Women's Project | Wed, Aug 1, 2001

IGTN Positions on the WTO, Executive Summary

"Women declare that trade is an instrument of development not profit! The Retreat of the International Gender & Trade Network (IGTN) Held in Cape Town August 12 -18, analyzed the impact various trade agreements in the World Trade Organization, have on women, households and communities. The IGTN affirms that there is a need for countries to trade, we further state that trade serves as one of the instruments for achieving the goals that we seek: prosperity, stability, freedom, and gender equality. We will resist any form of trade that evaluates our needs from the perspective of expanding world trade instead of development and poverty eradication."
Women's Economic Agenda in the 21st Century

Global Women's Project | Fri, Jun 1, 2001

Women's Economic Agenda in the 21st Century

"This paper addresses the questions: How have women benefited from organizing at the UN over the last 25 years? What are the strengths and weaknesses of the UN as a political space for women's human rights advocacy? How is globalization addressed in the Outcomes Document of Beijing + 5 at the UN? Why are women expanding their advocacy to include international institutions such as the WB, IMF and WTO? What critiques are women formulating around trade, investment, debt relief, poverty eradication, SAPs, oversees development assistance and national economic policy-making? This paper was released as the first paper in the the Center of Concern and International Gender and Trade Network Occasional Paper Series on Gender, Development and Trade."
From Women in Development to Gender and Trade

Global Women's Project | Fri, Jun 1, 2001

From Women in Development to Gender and Trade

"This article reviews the Center's Women's Project, which was founded in 1974, in part, as a focal point for the Center's participation in the United Nations International Women's Year and the First UN Conference on Women held in Mexico City in 1975. Since then the Women's Project has been shaped by women's evolving consciousness and agenda through four World Conferences and beyond: Mexico City, 1975; Copenhagen, 1980; Nairobi, 1985; and Beijing, 1995."
The Critical Role of Human Rights in Economic Policy (Spring 2001)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Fri, May 18, 2001

The Critical Role of Human Rights in Economic Policy (Spring 2001)

This article by Aldo Caliari examines the role that human rights should play in the formation of economic policy citing a 1998 statement of the Committee on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights, “the realms of trade, finance and investment are in no way exempt from these general [human rights] principles.”

FREE TRADE'S LITTLE SECRET

Global Women's Project | Thu, Mar 1, 2001

FREE TRADE'S LITTLE SECRET

"Maria Riley, O.P., Coordinator of the Global Women's Project at the Center, welcomes the Bush Administration's hypocritical decision on steel tariffs as a rare honest Moment of Truth for global policies that impact billions of people. All trade is Managed Trade and should be managed for the global common good and pro-poor development."
Free Trade Area of the Americas:  Participation, Accountability and Transparency

Global Women's Project | Thu, Mar 1, 2001

Free Trade Area of the Americas: Participation, Accountability and Transparency

"In order to achieve a shared and just vision for trade in the Western Hemisphere, FTAA governments must work with civil society to identify the issues that are at stake as well as the structures and procedures for communication and policymaking that should be in place. In addition, civil society groups must continue to strengthen their voice through social movement building, so that governments are held accountable for their actions. If all of these occur, it just may be possible to ensure that social development is at the core of trade and investment policymaking."
Submission to UN FFD Process Addresses Human Rights and Global Economic Governance (2000)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Wed, Nov 8, 2000

Submission to UN FFD Process Addresses Human Rights and Global Economic Governance (2000)

Addressing the relationship of the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund and the World Trade Organization with the UN system, this paper, a Center of Concern submission to the Preparatory Process of the Financing for Development Conference, asserts that in order to support development the coherence and consistency among those institutions must be grounded in and oriented by the international human rights law framework.

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