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Trade Liberalization and the Role of International Financial Institutions

Global Women's Project | Thu, Oct 14, 2004

Trade Liberalization and the Role of International Financial Institutions

This article provides a situation analysis of emerging issues facing developing countries in the
multilateral trade and finance system. The expanded involvement of the IFIs in trade-related
activities has resulted in constraints on the national development strategies of borrowing countries,
and the inter-linkages between trade and financial policies can reinforce and prolong poverty and
inequality. It argues that, while policy integration is vital for realising effective solutions to
developmental problems, the current methods of trade-finance policy integration are unlikely to
resolve these issues.
Letter to World Bank President regarding World Bank's interference in trade negotiations (September 2004)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Tue, Sep 28, 2004

Letter to World Bank President regarding World Bank's interference in trade negotiations (September 2004)

The Center of Concern organized an effort to write to the World Bank President, Mr. James Wolfensohn, to denounce the World Bank's weighin on one side of ongoing WTO trade negotiations. As negotiations to achieve a framework agreement at the WTO were going on, a World Bank official criticized an element of a proposal by the European Union that would have exempted poor countries from having to make substantial tariff cuts. "We do not believe that it is appropriate for an institution like the Bank to formulate an assessment of a country’s trade negotiating offer, as it has happened in this case, no matter its substance." , the organizations said in the letter.

 

Capacity of International Financial Institutions to Support Trade in Low-income Countries (September 2004)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Wed, Sep 1, 2004

Capacity of International Financial Institutions to Support Trade in Low-income Countries (September 2004)

This briefing paper , a background paper for the Commonwealth Ministerial Meeting 2004, gives an in-depth discussion of civil society perspectives on the issues involved in the expanding role of international financial institutions in trade- and investment-related activities.
Women, Just Trade, and the Central America Free Trade Agreement

Global Women's Project | Wed, May 5, 2004

Women, Just Trade, and the Central America Free Trade Agreement

CAFTA, like the North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) before itand the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) that is currently being negotiated, is yet another example of the failure of trade to positively impact the more than one billion people living in poverty
in the world today, the majority of whom are women. Ten years after its implementation, the differential gender impacts of NAFTA have yet o be examined and calls for gender assessments of the FTAA have gone un-heeded. By failing to include any analysis of how CAFTA may affect women and men differently, this trade agreement promises to further impoverish women throughout the region, endanger their health and well-being, and undermine their ability to protect their families, communities, environments, and livelihoods.
Trade Policies and Development: What Role for the Bretton Woods Institutions? (April 2004)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Tue, Apr 13, 2004

Trade Policies and Development: What Role for the Bretton Woods Institutions? (April 2004)

Trade Policies and Development: What Role for the Bretton Woods Institutions?, a panel discussion organized by the International Working Group on Trade-Finance Linkages and the Heinrich Boell Foundation , featuring civil society organizations, World Bank and IMF representatives.

 

Report on National Gender and Trade Consultations (May-September 2003)

Global Women's Project | Thu, Jan 22, 2004

Report on National Gender and Trade Consultations (May-September 2003)

In 2002, the U.S. Gender and Trade Network (USGTN) decided to initiate a national debate on the linkages between gender and trade policies in an effort to encourage women in the U.S. to deliberately make these links as part of a long-term vision for social and economic justice in this country and abroad. Through this process, we hoped to highlight the differential impacts on women and men in the U.S. as well as empower U.S. women to speak out as leaders whose voices must not be ignored in trade policymaking. We drafted a framework from which community activists could organize consultations in their communities and begin dialogues on gender and trade to start this process. Well known organizers were contacted in Iowa, Chicago, St. Louis, San Antonio, and New York to begin a series of conversations on gender and trade as partners with USGTN. In 2003, six meetings took place. This report provides the background to the consulta process, analysis of the context in which the national consultations took place, descriptions and outcomes of each of the six consultations, and ideas for appropriate next steps.

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