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More than a Numbers Game? Ensuring that the Millennium Development Goals Address Structural Injustice

Global Women's Project | Tue, Sep 6, 2005

More than a Numbers Game? Ensuring that the Millennium Development Goals Address Structural Injustice

"The MDGs represent an attempt to articulate, at the highest political level and in a comprehensive fashion, the priority areas of social, economic and environmental development that need to be pursued in order to reduce poverty and enable sustainable development. The multi-dimensional nature of the goals makes them an important step beyond the use of economic growth as an indirect measure of poverty reduction. The goals are not perfect, nor are they ambitious enough, but their achievement would mark a major step towards a more just world."
Long Due Reform? The International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, and Global Economic Governance 60 Years Later (2005)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Thu, Aug 4, 2005

Long Due Reform? The International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, and Global Economic Governance 60 Years Later (2005)

The International Financial Institutions (IFIs) are key players within the current architecture of global governance. Sixty years after the creation of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank in Bretton Woods, New Hampshire, their role and their relationship with other key institutions such as the UN are being called into question more than ever before.  This paper from Coopération Internationale pour le Développement et la Solidarité (CIDSE) examines the Bretton Woods Institutions 60 years later.
Making the Connections: U.S. Domestic Agricultural Policy and International Trade, An Interfaith Perspective

Global Women's Project | Thu, Aug 4, 2005

Making the Connections: U.S. Domestic Agricultural Policy and International Trade, An Interfaith Perspective

Every person has the right to an adequate amount of nutritious food, through production or purchase, to sustain a dignified human life. Despite decades of domestic and international initiatives, however, 852 million people on Earth are still hungry.

The way that the United States structures its food and agricultural system has global consequences. How people eat and the agricultural policies that are set by U.S. politicians directly affect the lives of farmers and farmworkers, consumers and citizens, both domestically and internationally. Changes to U.S. domestic agricultural policy, in conjunction with restructuring international trade and investment policy, have human rights implications and the potential to alleviate or exacerbate poverty and food insecurity worldwide.

Debates surrounding the 2007 Farm Bill, the piece of legislation outlining U.S. food and agricultural policy, have already begun and the livelihoods of many people, both domestically and internationally, depend on the outcome of these debates.
G-8 Summit Makes Poverty A Story - But Nothing Else (July 2005)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Fri, Jul 22, 2005

G-8 Summit Makes Poverty A Story - But Nothing Else (July 2005)

"This week the 2005 Summit of the Group of 8 leaders of industrialized countries took place in Gleneagles, Scotland. The Summit stood high among the frantic series of high-level meetings, reports and other advocacy moments that, because of their focus on development issues and on Africa, held promise for a 2005 in which important decisions would improve the living conditions of thousands. However, clouded by despicable terrorist attacks in London that threatened to derail the agenda of the meeting –and at some point the meeting itself –the Summit failed to meet expectations," says this article.
The 2005 G-8 Meeting: Any Hope For Justice?

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Fri, May 20, 2005

The 2005 G-8 Meeting: Any Hope For Justice?

"As world leaders prepare for the July 2005 G-8 meetings in Gleneagles, Scotland, activists around the world are turning their their focus to three broad areas: debt, aid, and trade. ""The greatest hopes for positive outcomes at Gleneagles are pinned on the debt issue,"" Aldo Caliari, Director of the Center's Rethinking Bretton Woods project, writes in this article appeared in Center Focus. 

Financing for Development: Long-Term Commitment to Global Governance Reform (2005)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Fri, May 20, 2005

Financing for Development: Long-Term Commitment to Global Governance Reform (2005)

"Consistent with the vision that the 2002 Conference represented a starting point for a dialogue rather than a final product, Aldo Caliari, Director of the Rethinking Bretton Woods project, writes. The FFD conference ""has provided a political space to address the full range of sources of finance in an integrated and holistic way: mobilization of domestic resources and of international private resources, trade, debt, and public overseas development assistance."" Find out what progress has been made, and where the conference is going in this update."
An Exercise In Stalemate? World Bank /IMF Spring 2005 Meetings (2005)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Wed, Apr 20, 2005

An Exercise In Stalemate? World Bank /IMF Spring 2005 Meetings (2005)

An assessment of the results of the World Bank/IMF Spring 2005 meetings reveals a leadership and decision-making machinery in crises. A number of major agenda issues that require rapid action continue to face stalemate at the highest levels in these institutions. Center of Concern staff member Aldo Caliari offers highlights of the meetings.
CAFTA Rules on Sovereign Debt: Cementing the Chains of Debt (May 2005)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Wed, Apr 13, 2005

CAFTA Rules on Sovereign Debt: Cementing the Chains of Debt (May 2005)

The rules of the Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA) have been widely criticized by debt campaigners for embodying a model of development that is certain to maintain, if not worsen, the debt woes of its developing country members. In spite of this, CAFTA rules that directly govern the treatment of sovereign debt have received relatively little attention and exposure. In fact, by extending to sovereign debt the application of rules elaborated in the context of investment agreements and with the aim of protection of foreign investors (such as Most Favoured Nation, National Treatment and investor-state arbitration), CAFTA spares no effort to close all possible exits to the debt problems of Central American countries.

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