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Aid For Trade Raises Concerns: Choosing between a Development Round and a Development Face (March 2006)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Mon, Mar 20, 2006

Aid For Trade Raises Concerns: Choosing between a Development Round and a Development Face (March 2006)

The coordination and political convergence among the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund and the World Trade organization was again in evidence last December at the Hong Kong WTO Ministerial. Throughout last year several important official meetings were targeted by activists as opportunities to promote pro-development outcomes on international aid, debt and trade. From Center Focus, Issue 170/March 2006
Did You Know...Fact Sheets: U.S. Government Initiatives on Trade

Global Women's Project | Thu, Feb 2, 2006

Did You Know...Fact Sheets: U.S. Government Initiatives on Trade

There are a series of trade initiatives that are sponsored and/or driven by the U.S. government through a variety of mechanisms which are moving at a rapid pace. Trade and investment policies will have major impacts on the region and globally. The Global Women's Project at the Center of Concern is concerned with the gender and social impacts of trade and investment agreements that favor corporate interests over national sovereignty and the rights of people, the market over real development needs.

The below fact sheets critique the impact that these policies are having on women, their families and their communities. They are designed to serve a proactive role in critiquing and shaping the power relationships behind these policies. Because of our role as gender activists in the North, we recognize and oppose the fact that the U.S. is using a variety of mechanisms to push an agenda which is hindering the common good.

RBW delivers papers at UNCTAD meeting on Debt Sustainabilty and Development Strategies (2005)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Tue, Nov 22, 2005

RBW delivers papers at UNCTAD meeting on Debt Sustainabilty and Development Strategies (2005)

In these papers commissioned by UNCTAD for its Expert Meeting on Debt Sustainability and Development Strategies, Aldo Caliari analyses the debt –trade connection.

The first paper focuses on debt management initiatives and the need for a change in paradigm. Debt and trade policies are perceived to be a crucial part of this complex of policies. However, the close interdependence that exists between the asymmetries in the trade system and the chronic nature of the overindebtedness problem faced by developing countries oftentimes goes missing in policy initiatives, the author argues.

The second paper focuses on the threats to debt prevention and resolution stemming from bilateral investment treaties (BITs) provisions on sovereign debt restructuring.

 

Center Focus, Issue 169 - November 2005

Center of Concern | Tue, Nov 15, 2005

Center Focus, Issue 169 - November 2005

In this Issue:

  • Introduction: Power and the Common Good - James E. Hug, SJ
  • Doha Development Agenda Fades at the WTO - Maria Riley, OP
  • The Role of the BWIs in the Global Trading System - Aldo Caliari
  • Latin America-Caribbean Seminar on Trade-Finance Linkages - Aldo Caliari
  • Closing the Door on Corporate Influence - Peter O'Driscoll
  • CAFTA - One Step Back, Two Steps Forward? - Kristin Sampson
The 2005 G8 Meeting: Making Poverty History? (2005)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Tue, Sep 6, 2005

The 2005 G8 Meeting: Making Poverty History? (2005)

The 2005 Summit of the Group of 8 leaders of industrialized countries took place in Gleneagles, Scotland, July 6-8. The Summit stood tall among the frantic series of 2005 high-level meetings, reports and other advocacy moments which held promise because of their focus on development issues and on the problems in Africa. However, clouded by despicable terrorist attacks in London that threatened to derail the agenda of the meetings and at some point the meeting itself the July 2005 Summit failed to meet the expectations of so many faith-based and secular NGOs, groups and movements.
More than a Numbers Game? Ensuring that the Millennium Development Goals Address Structural Injustice

Global Women's Project | Tue, Sep 6, 2005

More than a Numbers Game? Ensuring that the Millennium Development Goals Address Structural Injustice

"The MDGs represent an attempt to articulate, at the highest political level and in a comprehensive fashion, the priority areas of social, economic and environmental development that need to be pursued in order to reduce poverty and enable sustainable development. The multi-dimensional nature of the goals makes them an important step beyond the use of economic growth as an indirect measure of poverty reduction. The goals are not perfect, nor are they ambitious enough, but their achievement would mark a major step towards a more just world."

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