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A Human Development Approach to Debt Sustainability (April 2006)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Sat, Apr 29, 2006

A Human Development Approach to Debt Sustainability (April 2006)

This panel discussion at the World Bank's spring 2006 meetings brought together civil society representatives, staff and Board members of the Bretton Woods Institutions to examine the following questions:  Has the Debt Sustainability Framework been up to the task? Does it address the flaws of the HIPC Initiative? Does it incorporate the call by civil society organizations to cancel the debt as an instrument to free resources to fulfill human development priorities?
Trade-Related Job Losses:  A Gender Analysis

Global Women's Project | Sun, Apr 23, 2006

Trade-Related Job Losses: A Gender Analysis

This research evaluates gender biases in trade-related employment changes in the U.S. manufacturing industries.  We find that existing patterns of occupational segregation have ensured that female workers are more vulnerable to trade-related insecurities.  We also find that the patterns of segregation make it less likely that female workers will benefit from potential gains from trade.  We believe that the extent of this bias highlighted here should provide a strong motivation to evaluate the effectiveness of trade-related emloyment eompensation and adjustment programs from a gender perspective.
Poor Not Benefitting from World Bank Trade Policies

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Thu, Mar 23, 2006

Poor Not Benefitting from World Bank Trade Policies

A report from the World Bank's Independent Evaluation Group confirms that trade liberalization has indeed failed to benefit the poor, in large measure because liberalization advocates did not "fully take the external environment into account sufficiently, and thus did not distinguish the impact of external trade policies and shocks on trade outcomes for different groups of developing countries.
Aid For Trade Raises Concerns: Choosing between a Development Round and a Development Face (March 2006)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Mon, Mar 20, 2006

Aid For Trade Raises Concerns: Choosing between a Development Round and a Development Face (March 2006)

The coordination and political convergence among the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund and the World Trade organization was again in evidence last December at the Hong Kong WTO Ministerial. Throughout last year several important official meetings were targeted by activists as opportunities to promote pro-development outcomes on international aid, debt and trade. From Center Focus, Issue 170/March 2006
Did You Know...Fact Sheets: U.S. Government Initiatives on Trade

Global Women's Project | Thu, Feb 2, 2006

Did You Know...Fact Sheets: U.S. Government Initiatives on Trade

There are a series of trade initiatives that are sponsored and/or driven by the U.S. government through a variety of mechanisms which are moving at a rapid pace. Trade and investment policies will have major impacts on the region and globally. The Global Women's Project at the Center of Concern is concerned with the gender and social impacts of trade and investment agreements that favor corporate interests over national sovereignty and the rights of people, the market over real development needs.

The below fact sheets critique the impact that these policies are having on women, their families and their communities. They are designed to serve a proactive role in critiquing and shaping the power relationships behind these policies. Because of our role as gender activists in the North, we recognize and oppose the fact that the U.S. is using a variety of mechanisms to push an agenda which is hindering the common good.

RBW delivers papers at UNCTAD meeting on Debt Sustainabilty and Development Strategies (2005)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Tue, Nov 22, 2005

RBW delivers papers at UNCTAD meeting on Debt Sustainabilty and Development Strategies (2005)

In these papers commissioned by UNCTAD for its Expert Meeting on Debt Sustainability and Development Strategies, Aldo Caliari analyses the debt –trade connection.

The first paper focuses on debt management initiatives and the need for a change in paradigm. Debt and trade policies are perceived to be a crucial part of this complex of policies. However, the close interdependence that exists between the asymmetries in the trade system and the chronic nature of the overindebtedness problem faced by developing countries oftentimes goes missing in policy initiatives, the author argues.

The second paper focuses on the threats to debt prevention and resolution stemming from bilateral investment treaties (BITs) provisions on sovereign debt restructuring.

 

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