COC

Free Trade Area of the Americas

Breaking Boundaries II-Women and the Free Trade Area of the Americas: Understanding the Connections

Global Women's Project | Wed, Oct 15, 2003

Breaking Boundaries II-Women and the Free Trade Area of the Americas: Understanding the Connections

This publication is a joint effort of participants in the U.S. Gender and Trade Network (USGTN). It is a popular education tool on ""Women and the Free Trade Agreement of the Americas (FTAA)"" which includes analysis of the potential impacts of the FTAA from a gender perspective.This resource explores the impacts of privatization, deregulation, and NAFTA on services, investment, migration, militarization, labor, and agriculture and examines how this relates to regional integration in the Americas. This publication is available as a popular educational tool for activists with a particular focus on the U.S. experience.The resource booklet includes discussion questions and provides reference and background information that is useful in: (1) raising awareness among women and different communities across the U.S. about the impacts of free trade and the potential impacts of the FTAA and (2) mobilizing them to get involved in the debate and promote the common good through economic policymaking in the Americas.
IGTN Update on the FTAA

Global Women's Project | Fri, May 16, 2003

IGTN Update on the FTAA

"Following the Quito Ministerial that took place in Ecuador in November, 2002, a variety of non-governmental groups reported on the possibility that the FTAA might be under distress due to heated political differences amongst governments over the potential losses, particularly in the area of agriculture. Five months later, it is hard to say what is truly at play."
Update on the FTAA

Global Women's Project | Sat, May 10, 2003

Update on the FTAA

"The Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) is a free trade agreement that is currently being negotiated among 34 economies in the Western Hemisphere. Representatives from North America, the Caribbean, Central America and South America are working to achieve the largest regional integration ever between developed and developing countries, with the goal of liberalizing trade and investment in goods and services by the year 2005. There is speculation that negotiations will be completed as early as 2004."
Free Trade Area of the Americas:  Participation, Accountability and Transparency

Global Women's Project | Thu, Mar 1, 2001

Free Trade Area of the Americas: Participation, Accountability and Transparency

"In order to achieve a shared and just vision for trade in the Western Hemisphere, FTAA governments must work with civil society to identify the issues that are at stake as well as the structures and procedures for communication and policymaking that should be in place. In addition, civil society groups must continue to strengthen their voice through social movement building, so that governments are held accountable for their actions. If all of these occur, it just may be possible to ensure that social development is at the core of trade and investment policymaking."