COC

economic rights

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Fri, Nov 22, 2013

New Cambridge Press Publication Features Aldo Caliari's Work on Millennium Development Goals and Human Rights

In a chapter contributed to the book, Millennium Development Goals and Human Rights: Past, Present, and Future, recently published by Cambridge University Press, RBW Project Director Aldo Caliari examines the relationship between Millennium Development Goal 8 and international human rights standards from a theoretical and practical perspective.

 

Structural Adjustment, Trade Liberalization and Women's Enjoyment of Their Economic and Social Rights

Global Women's Project | Mon, Feb 21, 2000

Structural Adjustment, Trade Liberalization and Women's Enjoyment of Their Economic and Social Rights

"In the current political and social climate of extreme market liberalism, trade liberalism and corporatism there is even greater danger of the further marginalization of economic and social rights. This is because policy makers and their economic advisers who have succumbed to the neoliberal paradigm with its emphasis on the free market, free trade and a pecuniary notion of competition, promote growth and efficiency over social development and equity."
Economic Rights and Economic Justice in Economic Theory and Policy: An Introductory Note

Global Women's Project | Sat, Feb 21, 1998

Economic Rights and Economic Justice in Economic Theory and Policy: An Introductory Note

"As discussed in ""What Are Economic and Social Rights,"" Economic, Social and Cultural Rights have been marginalized in the evolution of the international and national human rights system. The source of this marginalization can be traced to two historical socio-political processes: male and class biases in liberalism and the post World War II cold war dynamics. However, there is yet another very important reason (which is inextricably intertwined with the capitalism / communism split) behind the marginalization of economic rights. That force is the dominant (orthodox) economic analysis and economic policy. The analytical framework of orthodox economics has historically been a very exclusive and narrow discourse based on highly restrictive assumptions about human nature, the good life, the good society and the structures that must be created to ensure the optimal operations of that society. Within this framework discussions of economic and social rights have been ignored, marginalized or otherwise subsumed under narrow discussion of efficiency, productivity, economic liberty, property rights and corporate rights. "
What are Economic and Social Rights

Global Women's Project | Sat, Feb 21, 1998

What are Economic and Social Rights

"The Universal Declaration of Human Rights affirmed the essential dignity and integrity of human beings. It recognized human beings entitlement to the means necessary to promote and protect human dignity. It also recognized the crucial and inextricable intertwinement between civil and political rights and access to resources and opportunities to utilize human capabilities for the self-realization necessary to assure and maintain personhood. This seeming comprehensiveness made the International Bill of Human Rights appear to be a radically progressive ideology which could simultaneously serve as both a set of fundamental values governing the human condition; a tool for critical consciousness raising about power structures; and a path to empowerment for much of humanity. However, as it would turn out this was not the case."