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Center Focus, Issue 187 - Winter 2011

Center of Concern | Thu, Mar 3, 2011

Center Focus, Issue 187 - Winter 2011

In this Issue:

  •  Center of Concern at 40: Seeing the World Anew - Jim Hug, SJ
  • Winning the Wrong Future?  A Spiritual Challenge for the Decade Ahead - Jim Hug, SJ
  • Toward a New Economy - Julia Wartenberg
  • The Financial Reform Act: Building Capacity for a New Economy - Aldo Caliari
  • Windows on the Future - Jobs - Maria Riley, OP
  • Harry A. Fagan Roundtable Award 2011 to Education for Justice Staff
Presidential Politics:  Time for a new vision for the economy

Center of Concern | Thu, Oct 16, 2008

Presidential Politics: Time for a new vision for the economy

In last night's presidential debates, Senator McCain and Senator Obama offered competing vsions for the economy.  Both attempted to address the concerns and aspirations of middle class Americans in the midst of the dual housing and financial crises driven by Wall Street.  This got me thinking back to the root causes of the crises.  I’ve followed the technical discussions on bundled mortgage securities and over-leveraged firms, and no doubt many people made reckless decisions, but the problem lies even deeper with the economic philosophy that has reigned for over 30 years.
WTO+10 Meets Beijing+10: New Paper From The Global Women's Project

Global Women's Project | Tue, Mar 22, 2005

WTO+10 Meets Beijing+10: New Paper From The Global Women's Project

"After ten years of U.S. participation in the World Trade Organization and a political emphasis on greater international trade as an engine of economic growth, we must ask whether women are gaining or losing in terms of job opportunities and wages under current trade policy?"

In their new paper, Bankrupt U.S. Economic Policy Forecloses on Women's Human Rights: WTO+10 Meets Beijing+10: The Impacts of Trade Liberalization on Women's Human Rights, Maria Riley, OP, Alexandra Spieldoch, and Kristin Sampson, members of the Center's Global Women's Project, consider questions about trade policies' impacts not only on women's job opportunities and wages but also on their access to social services, and on how much political influence women have in local and national decision making.