COC

Networks

Global Women's Project | Wed, Jun 24, 2015

How is Technology Interrupting the Business Model of Human Trafficking?

According to the Economist's report on human trafficking, women suffer most severely. The report says, "victims of international trafficking are women forced into some form of prostitution." In Europe and Central and South Asia, women, often previous victims of trafficking, are expected to recruit other women. The BBC reports of USSD technology being applied to camouflage text messages and allow local authorities to locate a phone.

Global Women's Project | Mon, Sep 16, 2013

Promoting Immigration Reform

The Global Women's Project at the Center of Concern commends the recent Network's 'Nuns on the Bus' 15-state immigration reform bus tour and looks forward to the next leg of this historic journey! The Global Women's Project has championed the global rights of women for 40 years and supports these courageous sisters as they lobby for social justice. http://www.networklobby.org/bus

Interfaith Community Responses and Recommendations on the Global Hunger and Food Security Initiative Consultation Document

Global Women's Project | Wed, Jan 20, 2010

Interfaith Community Responses and Recommendations on the Global Hunger and Food Security Initiative Consultation Document

In response to U.S. plans for a Global Hunger and Food Security Initiative, diverse faith communities concerned about the role of development in lifting people around the globe out of poverty encouraged the administration to focus on small-producers. Investments in small-producers in particular drive broadly-shared economic development and increase the food supply. With greater prosperity, the consequent higher effective demand for industrial and other goods would induce dynamics that would be a significant source of economic growth.
IWG Elements Cover Letter

Global Women's Project | Wed, Jul 23, 2008

IWG Elements Cover Letter

The Interfaith Working Group on Trade and Investment offers the following statement as a guideline toward what we envision is necessary in order to make the current trade model more fair and just. We encourage you to read our alternative policies document, “Trade as if People and the Earth Mattered: a working document on alternatives”.
Trade As If People and Earth Matter:  A working document on alternatives

Global Women's Project | Wed, Jul 9, 2008

Trade As If People and Earth Matter: A working document on alternatives

Trade As If People and Earth Matter: A Working Document on Alternatives, seeks to contribute to the emerging dialogue on a new framework for trade that holds the promise of promoting just and sustainable development in the countries and areas where it is most needed. Trade policies and agreements must put people first! They should further genuine social and economic development for our neighbors around the world while preserving and creating good jobs here at home. They must support – not hinder – governments in adopting policies to protect public health and the natural environment. Trade policies must strike a balance between creating a predictable structure for international trade and preserving the policy space necessary for governments to foster and secure economic, social and human development for all their citizens.

Leisurely Development? Tourism in the Gullah Region

Global Women's Project | Sat, Dec 1, 2007

Leisurely Development? Tourism in the Gullah Region

Tourism development has been hailed by the International Financial Institutions (IFIs--World Bank, International Monetary Fund) and the World Trade Organization as a means for economic gain by creating jobs and enabling states to earn foreign exchange to invest in development. It has also been a strategy used in economically disadvantaged regions of the U.S. This article explores the often overlooked negative impacts of the strategy.
Making the Connections: U.S. Domestic Agricultural Policy and International Trade, An Interfaith Perspective

Global Women's Project | Thu, Aug 4, 2005

Making the Connections: U.S. Domestic Agricultural Policy and International Trade, An Interfaith Perspective

Every person has the right to an adequate amount of nutritious food, through production or purchase, to sustain a dignified human life. Despite decades of domestic and international initiatives, however, 852 million people on Earth are still hungry.

The way that the United States structures its food and agricultural system has global consequences. How people eat and the agricultural policies that are set by U.S. politicians directly affect the lives of farmers and farmworkers, consumers and citizens, both domestically and internationally. Changes to U.S. domestic agricultural policy, in conjunction with restructuring international trade and investment policy, have human rights implications and the potential to alleviate or exacerbate poverty and food insecurity worldwide.

Debates surrounding the 2007 Farm Bill, the piece of legislation outlining U.S. food and agricultural policy, have already begun and the livelihoods of many people, both domestically and internationally, depend on the outcome of these debates.