COC

Women and Econ

WTO+10 Meets Beijing+10: New Paper From The Global Women's Project

Global Women's Project | Tue, Mar 22, 2005

WTO+10 Meets Beijing+10: New Paper From The Global Women's Project

"After ten years of U.S. participation in the World Trade Organization and a political emphasis on greater international trade as an engine of economic growth, we must ask whether women are gaining or losing in terms of job opportunities and wages under current trade policy?"

In their new paper, Bankrupt U.S. Economic Policy Forecloses on Women's Human Rights: WTO+10 Meets Beijing+10: The Impacts of Trade Liberalization on Women's Human Rights, Maria Riley, OP, Alexandra Spieldoch, and Kristin Sampson, members of the Center's Global Women's Project, consider questions about trade policies' impacts not only on women's job opportunities and wages but also on their access to social services, and on how much political influence women have in local and national decision making.

Incorporating Gender Considerations for the Designation of Special Products in WTO Agriculture Negotiations

Global Women's Project | Thu, Mar 17, 2005

Incorporating Gender Considerations for the Designation of Special Products in WTO Agriculture Negotiations

"In her recent analysis ""Incorporating Gender Considerations for the Designation of Special Products in WTO Agriculture Negotiations,"  Maria Pia Hernandez, Coordinator of the IGTN's Geneva office, argues that" trade policies require an approach that recognizes the interconnections between trade and other macro and micro level policies, which involve gender relations, human development and socioeconomic processes"" especially when it comes to agricultural products.

"Some organizations like FAO have started talking about the 'feminization of agriculture' in the developing world, based on the facts that women represent 66% of the economically active population working in the sector and are identified as major providers of food and income for their families and communities in rural areas," she writes. ""Nonetheless, statistics have also demonstrated that women tend to be disproportionately poor and disadvantaged; representing over 70% of the poorest global population with low level of ownership, control and access to productive and economic resources, assets and markets."

Read her full analysis for more on how trade policies affect special products and have a real impact on women's lives all over the globe."
Beijing + 10 in light of the North American Free Trade Agreement: How have women fared?

Global Women's Project | Mon, Jan 31, 2005

Beijing + 10 in light of the North American Free Trade Agreement: How have women fared?

"The report argues that NAFTA has done little to improve the U.S. government's realization of commitments to women's economic and social rights made at the 1995 UN Fourth World Conference on Women. Ten years after the Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing, China, U.S. women, in solidarity with their sisters in other parts of the world, are struggling to understand what gains were made in the area of the economy – not only for themselves, but for their families and their communities. In the United States, it is clear that the government has not lived up to its promises in Beijing. Despite advocacy from national women's, development, labor and human rights groups, since Beijing the United States has done little to incorporate a gender analysis into its macroeconomic policies and into decision-making processes, nor has it acknowledged that its trade policies are having a negative and disproportionate impact on women and children than they are men."
Trade Liberalization and the Role of International Financial Institutions

Global Women's Project | Thu, Oct 14, 2004

Trade Liberalization and the Role of International Financial Institutions

This article provides a situation analysis of emerging issues facing developing countries in the
multilateral trade and finance system. The expanded involvement of the IFIs in trade-related
activities has resulted in constraints on the national development strategies of borrowing countries,
and the inter-linkages between trade and financial policies can reinforce and prolong poverty and
inequality. It argues that, while policy integration is vital for realising effective solutions to
developmental problems, the current methods of trade-finance policy integration are unlikely to
resolve these issues.
Women, Just Trade, and the Central America Free Trade Agreement

Global Women's Project | Wed, May 5, 2004

Women, Just Trade, and the Central America Free Trade Agreement

CAFTA, like the North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) before itand the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) that is currently being negotiated, is yet another example of the failure of trade to positively impact the more than one billion people living in poverty
in the world today, the majority of whom are women. Ten years after its implementation, the differential gender impacts of NAFTA have yet o be examined and calls for gender assessments of the FTAA have gone un-heeded. By failing to include any analysis of how CAFTA may affect women and men differently, this trade agreement promises to further impoverish women throughout the region, endanger their health and well-being, and undermine their ability to protect their families, communities, environments, and livelihoods.
Women Say No to CAFTA

Global Women's Project | Wed, Apr 28, 2004

Women Say No to CAFTA

"Representatives of women's organizations and social movements in Central America and the United States, led by the U.S. Gender and Trade Network (USGTN) and Las Dignas in El Salvador, have written this sign-on letter and background paper in opposition to the Central America Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA) and to urge Members of Congress in Central America and the U.S. to oppose the agreement should it come before them for approval. Take Action Now to stop this unjust trade agreement and send organizational sign-ons to fnageer@coc.org."
Report on National Gender and Trade Consultations (May-September 2003)

Global Women's Project | Thu, Jan 22, 2004

Report on National Gender and Trade Consultations (May-September 2003)

In 2002, the U.S. Gender and Trade Network (USGTN) decided to initiate a national debate on the linkages between gender and trade policies in an effort to encourage women in the U.S. to deliberately make these links as part of a long-term vision for social and economic justice in this country and abroad. Through this process, we hoped to highlight the differential impacts on women and men in the U.S. as well as empower U.S. women to speak out as leaders whose voices must not be ignored in trade policymaking. We drafted a framework from which community activists could organize consultations in their communities and begin dialogues on gender and trade to start this process. Well known organizers were contacted in Iowa, Chicago, St. Louis, San Antonio, and New York to begin a series of conversations on gender and trade as partners with USGTN. In 2003, six meetings took place. This report provides the background to the consulta process, analysis of the context in which the national consultations took place, descriptions and outcomes of each of the six consultations, and ideas for appropriate next steps.
Globalization and Catholic Social Teaching: A Reflective Synthesis

Global Women's Project | Thu, Dec 11, 2003

Globalization and Catholic Social Teaching: A Reflective Synthesis

Twenty-six scholars, academics and social justice activists gathered outside Toronto, September 25-28, 2003, to assess the relevance and promise of Catholic Social Teaching (CST) for the globalizing dynamics of today. A general consensus emerged from this group that CST in its present form has much to contribute to the world community, but it clearly cannot claim to be a global ethic, marked as it is by both the strengths and the clear limitations of being culturally western and theologically Catholic-Christian. The challenge is to develop a Catholic ethic for globalization that can be brought into constructive dialogue with the other faiths and cultures gracing the planet. That will put us on the only viable path toward a global ethic–an ethic that will then have to be expressed to the peoples of the world in the rich diversity of cultural forms that constitute the world’s faiths.

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