COC

Women and Econ

Feminist Political Economic Analysis of U.S. Chicken Industry

Global Women's Project | Fri, Sep 19, 2008

Feminist Political Economic Analysis of U.S. Chicken Industry

Kristin Sampson uses a feminist political economy (FPE) framework to analyze the U.S. commercial poultry industry as an exemplifier of a production model that is being replicated in poultry sectors across the globe as well as in other livestock, agricultural, and industrial sectors. Trade and investment liberalization brings the industrial model into direct contact with the traditional systems of raising chickens which still feature prominently in developing countries. In light of FPE, how does the industrial poultry production model fare in terms of advancing the sustaining and flourishing of life and providing sustainable livelihoods?
A Feminist Political Economy Framework

Global Women's Project | Fri, Mar 28, 2008

A Feminist Political Economy Framework

Feminist political economy is one among several heterodox economies that challenge the reigning orthodox neo-liberal economic model which emphasizes the market economy with growth and accumulation as its primary goals. FPE, in contrast, focuses on the provisioning of human needs and human well-being. It employs gender as a defining category and focuses on the actual lived experience of women, men and families and what it means to be a human person.

Religious Organizations Oppose U.S.-Colombia Free Trade Agreement

Global Women's Project | Fri, Mar 7, 2008

Religious Organizations Oppose U.S.-Colombia Free Trade Agreement

As representatives of religious institutions and faith-based organizations with extensive global relationships and concern, we oppose the pending U.S.-Colombia Free Trade Agreement (FTA). International trade and investment activities should advance the common good and be evaluated in light of their impact on those who are most vulnerable, including Afro-Colombian and Indigenous peoples. The U.S.-Colombia FTA fails these tests.
The Economic and Social Context of Human Trafficking

Global Women's Project | Sun, Oct 28, 2007

The Economic and Social Context of Human Trafficking

Human Trafficking, the current form of modern slavery, has escalated in the recent decade. According to UN statistics, over 2.4 million persons are trafficked a year in an illegal industry that reaps from $7 to $10million dollars annually, third only to the illegal trade in drugs and in arms. The illegal trade in human beings is both facilitated and driven by the effects of globalization economic integration and the continuing dominance of the system of patriarchy throughout the world. This power point examines the push/pull factors of trafficking and migration which brings many people into both forced economic labor and forced sexual labor.
Why do Gender Issues Remain Problematic to Development Agencies?

Global Women's Project | Thu, Feb 15, 2007

Why do Gender Issues Remain Problematic to Development Agencies?

Women worldwide, as individuals and through the Women’s Movement, have expended enormous personal and professional energy to ensure that the issues of women in development were addressed in major institutions, such as the World Bank, the UN and all its agencies, and in development organizations both governmental and private. However, despite these advances, gender inequalities persist across all societies and in all institutions and sectors. A kind of gender fatigue has set in among many advocates and institutions, which prompts the central question of this article: Why has gender remained such a difficult issue in the international NGO development community?
Case studies highlighting the gendered dynamic around agriculture, trade and food sovereignty.

Global Women's Project | Wed, Feb 14, 2007

Case studies highlighting the gendered dynamic around agriculture, trade and food sovereignty.

These fact sheets are part of a joint collaboration between the International Gender and Trade Network (IGTN) and the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy (IATP), and the entitled project, Transforming Women's Livelihoods in relation to food, agriculture and trade.

English Version      Spanish Version     French Version

Pages