COC

Focus Four: Human Rights in International Economic Policy

The G20, financial regulation and human rights (May 2012)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Fri, May 11, 2012

The G20, financial regulation and human rights (May 2012)

In the wake of the Wall Street debacle of 2008 and the threat of an impending new global depression, the Group of 20, created as a gathering of Finance Ministers in 1999, began to meet at Heads of State level, with an agenda of reshaping of the international financial system and coordination of financial and monetary policies in the long term.

Issue No. 4 of a series of primers prepared by the initiative "A bottom up approach to righting financial regulation" argues that while it is proper to not confuse the G20 with a formal institution, let alone one with human rights mandates, its member countries should not try to escape the fact that they have human rights  obligations to uphold. Indeed, their actions have significant impacts on the realization and enjoyment of human rights.

 

Financial Transaction Taxes: A Human Rights Imperative (March 2012)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Wed, Mar 28, 2012

Financial Transaction Taxes: A Human Rights Imperative (March 2012)

In this, Issue No. 3 of a series of primers prepared by the initiative "A bottom up approach to righting financial regulation,” Financial Transaction Taxes are examined from a human rights perspective.

"The human rights movement faces an unprecedented opportunity for revisiting and revitalizing the struggle for economic and social rights by demanding accountability for failures to protect human rights through economic policy. The establishment of a Financial Transaction Tax would be an important step in that human rights direction," the document states.

Central Banks: Do They Have Human Rights Obligations? (January 2012)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Sun, Jan 29, 2012

Central Banks: Do They Have Human Rights Obligations? (January 2012)

This second issue in a series of primers prepared by the initiative “A bottom up approach to righting financial regulation” looks at the accountability of central banks to human rights.

“Although most central banks are independent, they are in the end government bodies. As such, central banks are subject to the human rights obligations of their state,” it argues.

Why a Human Rights Approach to Financial Regulation is Needed (December 2011)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Mon, Dec 26, 2011

Why a Human Rights Approach to Financial Regulation is Needed (December 2011)

 

This is the first in a series of briefs prepared by the initiative "A bottom up approach to righting financial regulation," with the purpose of addressing the links between financial regulation and human rights.

"Now more than ever there is a need to counter-balance the often myopic views of financial experts with a broad array of social groups (consumer, labor, women, environment, indigenous people, and other "human rights-holders") in the design of financial policy," the piece argues.

“Human Rights Can Fix Our Broken Agricultural System,” Advocates Argue (December 2010)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Thu, Dec 9, 2010

“Human Rights Can Fix Our Broken Agricultural System,” Advocates Argue (December 2010)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 

Contact: Niko Lusiani, nlusiani@escr-net.org, tel: +1.212.681.1236, ext. 27 

“Human Rights Can Fix Our Broken Agricultural System,” Advocates Argue  

[10 December, 2010 | Bangkok/Brasilia/Buenos Aires/Cairo/Kampala/Kuala Lumpur/Lusaka/Mexico City/Manila/Nairobi/New York/Washington DC]

Does the Global Partnership for Development Reflect Human Rights? (March 2010)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Mon, Mar 29, 2010

Does the Global Partnership for Development Reflect Human Rights? (March 2010)

In 2000 all countries committed to developing a Global Partnership for Development. Speaking at a symposium hosted by Harvard University Law School, 10 years later, RBW Project Director Aldo Caliari presents a paper co-authored with Mac Darrow, Coordinator of the Human Rights and MDGs Unit of the OHCHR. The paper examines whether the Global Partnership for Development lived up to the human rights obligations of the international community.

Pages