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rbw/can-poor-benefit-infrastructure-and-investment-rbw-events-week-october-2014

Can the poor benefit from infrastructure and investment ? RBW events this week (October 2014)

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Wed, Oct 1, 2014

 

In the occasion of the upcoming Annual General Meetings of the World Bank/ IMF, the Rethinking Bretton Woods Project of the Center of Concern will be involved in the following events (All events are to be held at the World Bank I Building, at 1850 I St, N.W. Accreditation to attend World Bank/ IMF meetings is required).

 

·    RESPONSIBLE INFRASTRUCTURE FINANCE & GOVERNANCE


October 9 2014, 9 - 10:30 AM


Room I 2 - 250

 

·    DOING BUSINESS REPORT: HOW TO MAKE IT WORK FOR THE POOR?


October 10, 2014, 2 - 3:30 PM

Room I 2 - 250

 

·   THE IMPACT OF THE BRICS’ CONTINGENT RESERVE ARRANGEMENT (CRA) AND THE NEW DEVELOPMENT BANK (NDB)


October 11, 2014, 11:00 AM – 12:30 PM

Room I 2 – 210

 

See more details below:

 

 

RESPONSIBLE INFRASTRUCTURE FINANCE & GOVERNANCE

 

Sponsors:  Center of Concern, Heinrich Boell Foundation, EURODAD, Bretton Woods Project, and International Rivers

Speakers:

Ms. Nancy Alexander, Heinrich Boell Foundation

Mr. Mike Callaghan, Director, G20 Studies Centre, Lowy Institute for International Policy

Mr. Jordan Schwartz, Manager, Singapore Infrastructure Hub, World Bank

Ms. Maria Jose Romero, Policy and Advocacy Officer, Eurodad

Mr. Aldo Caliari, Director, Rethinking Bretton Woods Project, Center of Concern

 

 

Economic Infrastructure” (energy, transport, water, and ICT) is “front and center” on the development agenda, with additional financing requirements estimated at USD 1 trillion per year. This could double the percentage of GDP invested in such projects in many countries from 7% to 9%. To meet such requirements, the G20, the World Bank and other forums are discussing proposals to tap into external finance, public and private, to make up the estimated shortfall.

 

The need for infrastructure development is undisputed, but what magnitude of financing is required for different countries/regions? How will the anticipated initiatives related to infrastructure development (mega-projects) serve the most marginalized and how will it impact on the environment? What should be the role of development finance institutions in such a context? Who are the new entrants (e.g., long-term institutional investors, sovereign wealth funds)? What are the different financing models available and, in particular, what lessons have been learned from PPPs as one of those financing models? How should risks and benefits be allocated between the public and private financiers?

 

DOING BUSINESS REPORT: HOW TO MAKE IT WORK FOR THE POOR

Sponsors: CNCD, 11.11.11, CAFOD, Center of Concern, EURODAD, IBIS, ITUC, Urgewald, Oxfam International

Speakers:

Peter Bakvis, International Trade Union Confederation

Geoffrey Chongo, Programmes Director, Jesuit Center for Theological Reflection, Zambia

Jeroen Kwakkenbos Policy and Advocacy Manager, Eurodad

 

This round-table dialogue will be part of an ongoing series of discussions and side events held during previous Spring and Annual meetings on the Doing Business report. It will bring together World Bank staff, officials from donor and client governments, and CSO representatives from northern and southern countries to assess the latest reforms of the Doing Business report and how they could be better aligned to meet the needs of poor and marginalized communities.

 

Objectives of the session are:

•Establish a substantive dialogue between relevant stakeholders on the Doing Business report and how to improve it.

•Discuss the reforms of the report and how its substance can be aligned to World Bank’s main goals of poverty eradication and shared prosperity.

•Discuss the relevance of the reforms covered by the Doing Business report to MSMEs in World Bank client countries.

•Assess the value of benchmarking exercises in achieving development objectives.

 

THE IMPACT OF THE BRICS’ CONTINGENT RESERVE ARRANGEMENT (CRA) AND THE NEW DEVELOPMENT BANK (NDB)

Sponsor: Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR)

Speakers:

Mark Weisbrot, Co-Director, Center for Economic and Policy Research

Nancy Alexander, Director, Economic Governance Program of Heinrich Boell Foundation

Moderator: Aldo Caliari, Center of Concern

 

This panel will look at the potential impact of the new BRICS’ (Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa) driven institutions.  Can the CRA help prevent balance of payments crises in the coming years?  How can it manage to provide sufficient and timely balance of payments support and still have a low default rate, without imposing harmful conditions?  And how will the NDB choose investment projects that are socially beneficial?  What are the implications of these new institutions for the IMF and World Bank?