COC

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Sun, Dec 20, 2015

Not a good New Year’s resolution: the 2016 coming fiscal adjustment

Two new studies find that next year will mark the beginning of a second major period of contraction of expenditures globally in pursuit of austerity measures (e.g. reductions in wages, social safety nets and health and education subsidies). While the global financial crisis of 2008 seems far behind, this research shows that its effects are not, and budget reductions, as a percentage of Gross Domestic Product, are expected to impact 132 countries and hover around this level until 2020.

The good news, the authors state, is that austerity is not inevitable: alternatives to adjustment exist in all countries, if only the political will to implement them can be found.

Read more.

Center of Concern | Wed, Dec 16, 2015

Best Wishes for a Blessed Christmas and a Joyous New Year!

“Today, however, we have to realize that a true ecological approach always becomes a social approach; it must integrate questions of justice in debates on the environment, so as to hear both the cry of the earth and the cry of the poor.”

 ~ Pope Francis, Laudato Sí: On Care for Our Common Home, 49

 

This Christmas, may each of us truly embrace and live the message of Laudato Sí, remembering always, “…the world is a joyful mystery to be contemplated with gladness and praise.” In the spirit of St. Francis and Pope Francis, may we promote, by our faithful witness, the globalization of hope, in centers of concern around the globe. May we dedicate ourselves anew to caring for our common home and to building a better life for all members of the human family. The Center sincerely appreciates your financial and other support as we share your voice for global social justice throughout the year.

 

To request your copy of the 2016 Signs of the Times Social Justice Calendar or to make your donation to the Center, please click here. Supplies are limited, so get yours today!

Education for Justice | Wed, Dec 16, 2015

Center of Concern marks the Opening of the Year of Mercy

"How many are the wounds borne by the flesh of those who have no voice because their cry is muffled and drowned out by the indifference of the rich! During this Jubilee, the Church will be called even more to heal these wounds, to assuage them with the oil of consolation, to bind them with mercy and cure them with solidarity and vigilant care" (Misericordiae Vultus, #15).

 

Center team members Christine Hyland, Director of Development, and Anna Misleh, Assistant Editor of Education for Justice, celebrate the opening of the Year of Mercy at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception with His Eminence Donald Cardinal Wuerl on December 8, 2015.

Center of Concern | Tue, Dec 8, 2015

Center of Concern marks the Opening of the Year of Mercy

"How many are the wounds borne by the flesh of those who have no voice because their cry is muffled and drowned out by the indifference of the rich! During this Jubilee, the Church will be called even more to heal these wounds, to assuage them with the oil of consolation, to bind them with mercy and cure them with solidarity and vigilant care" (Misericordiae Vultus, #15).

 

Center team members Christine Hyland, Director of Development, and Anna Misleh, Assistant Editor of Education for Justice, celebrate the opening of the Year of Mercy at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception with His Eminence Donald Cardinal Wuerl on December 8, 2015.

Education for Justice | Wed, Nov 25, 2015

Bulletin Insert: Alternative Giving for Christmas

This bonus resource from Education for Justice highlights several organizations that offer suggestions for alternativing giving this Christmas season. To view the bulletin insert, click here: http://bit.ly/21gjKiw.

For more Advent and Christmas resources, visit www.educationforjustice.org.

Copyright © 2015, Education for Justice, a project of Center of Concern.

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Mon, Nov 16, 2015

Argentina after the insolvency: Not yet a plaything of "vulture funds"

After the profound economic and social crisis that engulfed Argentina in 2001, the country renegotiated the terms of its sovereign debt with more than 92 per cent of its creditors. NML Capital was among those creditors who refused to accept the terms of the agreement reached with the majority and sued the country in US courts for payment of a 100 per cent of their credits.

In an article appeared on the German Forum on Environment and Development’s magazine, RBW Project Director Aldo Caliari explains how NML Capital’s practice fits into a business model adopted by “vulture funds” and what is at stake in Argentinean attempts to fend off their judicial and political tactics.(Photo credit: CC/Flickr/Jubilee Debt Campaign).

Center of Concern | Mon, Nov 16, 2015

Antalya G20 Summit gives birth to new infrastructure finance model: Will it be for the better?

On November 15-16, 2015, the Leaders of the Group of 20 countries meet in Antalya, Turkey, for their annual summit. After five years in which the issue of investment in infrastructure has been consistently on the G20’s agenda, at this summit there will be already a substantial number of work products for the group to consider. Throughout these studies and papers –most of them commissioned from international organizations such as the World Bank and OECD – the contours of the G20’s vision for infrastructure finance emerge with increasing clarity. How will the balance between financial interests and the human rights of citizens and communities seeking access to better infrastructure be affected? The following articles offer a good glimpse. (Photo credit: CC/Flickr/International Monetary Fund)

The G20’s principles for institutional investment: A Trojan horse for finance-driven infrastructure?

Mega-infrastructure as “structural adjustment 2.0”

A Standard Contract for PPPs the World Over: Recommended PPP Contractual Provisions Submitted to the G20

Five things that can promote transparency in Public-Private Partnerships

Read a RightingFinance blog and a Eurodad blog.

Rethinking Bretton Woods | Fri, Oct 30, 2015

Human rights issues in private market financing for infrastructure

In the last few years, policy-makers have been turning their attention to ways to mobilize the USD 85 trillion reportedly held by institutional investors such as pension funds, insurance companies and private equity funds to finance infrastructure. A model of financing with some distinct characteristics is emerging as a result.

While human rights law creates obligations for all parties involved in an infrastructure project, the involvement of institutional investors in the financing or operation of the infrastructure entails additional consequences for financial regulation. (Photo credit: CC/Flickr/Wally Gobetz)

Learn more by reading this new publication by RightingFinance.

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