COC

International Panel Assesses Results of Uruguay’s Tax Reforms and Impact on its Future Economic Stability

Center of Concern | Thu, Sep 26, 2013

Montevideo, Uruguay—At an August 16 meeting, the government of Uruguay took part in a public forum, during which economic experts presented research on social justice and the impact of Latin America’s tax practices. The event sparked discussion among panelists about the role of tax policies in creating economic inequality. Speaking on Uruguay’s experience, the Director of the Tax Collection Agency and the Minister of Labor of Uruguay recounted how their country’s decade of expansion was being bolstered by tax policies that sought to lower debt and unemployment and decrease poverty. 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 23, 2013

Contact: Carolyn Bain, Ph.D., Director of Communications, Center of Concern, 1225 Otis St., NE, Washington, DC

cbain@coc.org   202-635-2757 #124

International Panel Assesses Results of Uruguay’s Tax Reforms and Impact on its Future Economic Stability

Center of Concern's Aldo Caliari Addresses Public Forum on Progress and Challenges on Social Justice and Tax Justice in Uruguay

Montevideo, Uruguay—At an August 16 meeting, the government of Uruguay took part in a public forum, during which economic experts presented research on social justice and the impact of Latin America’s tax practices. The event sparked discussion among panelists about the role of tax policies in creating economic inequality. Speaking on Uruguay’s experience, the Director of the Tax Collection Agency and the Minister of Labor of Uruguay recounted how their country’s decade of expansion was being bolstered by tax policies that sought to lower debt and unemployment and decrease poverty.

Aldo Caliari, Center of Concern’s “Rethinking Bretton Woods Project” director, cited Uruguay as an example of how appeals from civil society for progressive taxation to reduce financial fragility and inequality are being heard throughout Latin America. Caliari says, “How to collect tax revenue in a fair and progressive way was prominent in our forum’s discussions. Uruguay’s recent introduction of tax on earnings puts this country more in line with fiscal trends in developed countries.”

“More can be done to help governments understand that ‘good economics’ means financial stability and social justice are not at odds with each other,” says Caliari. “The IMF recently published findings noting that financial inequality tends to create a leveraged economy, which contributes to financial crises. Financial stability does not happen in the absence of fair income distribution and active labor and social policy interventions.”

Center of Concern’s Rethinking Bretton Woods (RBW) Project was founded in 1995 to promote reforms of international financial institutions, such as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. Over time, its focus has evolved to promote reform of the international financial system, its rules and institutions, with the purpose of democratizing economic policy-making, achieving human rights and sustainable development.

The project carries out advocacy-oriented research, popular education and coalition-building engaging government and intergovernmental officials, policy-makers, civil society organizations, academics, grassroots activists, social movements and the public. It works closely with partner organizations in the U.S., Europe, and all the regions of the Global South.

Since 1971, Center of Concern experts have contributed research, education, and advocacy from Catholic social tradition in order to create a world where economic, political, and cultural systems promote sustainable flourishing of the global community.

###